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Our Non-Religious Beliefs Page 130 of  131

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  • Perhaps no one thing in life has led mankind to believe that which is false as his quest for certainty.


  • Impossible” is a barrier to progress while “not yet” is the gate.


  • Most look at words as being like tightly packed little suitcases which contain specific things; however, words are empty suitcases whose contents vary over time depending on the messages to be delivered.


  • It is a major mistake to believe that another believes something merely because that person contends so; rather it is wiser to believe that another only claims to believe something. Few things are as common as individuals claiming to believe that which they do not believe.


  • Although we may believe that we understand others, unless we know their addictions, whether they be to substances or to behaviors, they are still strangers.


  • Many like to contend that you can’t put a round peg into a square hole or vice-versa; however that is false. If the pegs are much smaller than the holes, it is easy to do so. In real life, this is often the case.


  • Those who believe that a romantic kiss can put out one’s fire obviously have never kissed. A romantic kiss is the gasoline’s equivalent in putting out fires.


  • It is easy to see why there are so many true believers; beliefs are like featherbeds while doubts are like sharp pebbles in our shoes.


  • As long as doubts cloud our beliefs, we will seek comfort in the company of those who believe as we do.


  • There is the very strong and erroneous tendency to believe that proving another’s opinion to be false that that will make our belief true.


  • In order to understand our existence, we need to recognize that since the first human and until the last, we have always been just one but divided by our misconceptions about the true nature of time and space.


  • Perhaps all that we mean by being mentally healthy is the widespread prevalence of certain mental disorders.


  • One characteristic of wisdom is that it performs like a teeter-totter in that the more one knows the more aware that person becomes of ones ignorance. It works the reverse way too.


  • Dictionaries shouldn’t be regarded at as a source of the meanings of words; rather they should be regarded as history books of what others have meant by the words that they’ve used


  • Mankind’s ignorance is obviously enormous as evidenced by our belief that the ignorance is concentrated in others.


  • Because so much of what we believe to be true is false, a newborn might be closer to the ultimate truths than its parents.


  • It isn’t as though mankind knows nothing; rather the problem is that we don’t know which of our beliefs are true and which are false.


  • The future arrives whether we choose to act or not; however, our future arrives when we choose to act wisely.


  • When we are wise enough to look back on our earlier times and recognize our foolish beliefs and acts, it is even wiser to assume that someday we will probably look back on the present as being the same.


  • Most people would be much happier if they were curious about everything but only concerned themselves with the things that they can do something about. It is a waste of life to dwell on those things which one cannot change.


  • It is wonderful to have talent; it is wonderful to be able to do many things well; however, it is only what we do that will make any difference.


  • There are those who claim to be willing to die for their beliefs. In general those are the kinds of beliefs which refuse to die for them.


  • Those who seek to understand everything will eventually discover that they’ve understood nothing.


  • One of life’s certainties is that those who believe in an afterlife will not be disappointed.


  • When confronting setbacks, it is well to recall that the first stage of grief tends to be denial and the last stage acceptance. Those who prosper tend to not deny and go directly to acceptance and make the most of what has happened. Those who fail tend to remain locked in the prison of denial until it is too late.


  • We might be mistaken when we assume that others don’t play by the rules, simply because it may be that others are playing a different game than we are.


  • Although we can never really share our pains and sorrows, it is comforting to try.


  • At mankind’s major turning points, history tends to whisper to us when it should be shouting.


  • Most disagreements are over conclusions and not observations; and therefore one is of sounder mind to doubt all conclusions and accept none as being The Truth.


  • If we can’t trust the words of another we should never trust their deeds.


  • Going into debt seems like a positive thing at times if one ignores the bondage which repayment requires. In essence, individuals should look at creating personal debt as being like selling one’s self into slavery simply because slavery provides free room and board.


  • Mankind seems forever plagued by the belief that if it can’t conceive of something then that something doesn’t exist.


  • Although George Santayana is remembered as saying: “Those who don't remember the past are doomed to repeat it.” He should also have said that even those who do remember the past will probably ignore it also because they never fail to believe: “It’s different this time.”


  • The less certain that we are of our understandings the closer we will become to understanding.


  • The ultimate denial is when we deny that we are denying.


  • Whenever we use or hear another express the word “is”, it helps to clarify out thoughts to mentally substitute the word “exists”. If this then seems true, then the word “is” will probably be descriptive.


  • Undoubtedly being able to learn is a valuable ability; however, often overlooked is the very important ability to unlearn that which has been shown to be false.


  • We tend to look upon addiction as a negative; however, many are actually addicted to doing the kinds of things which benefit others as well as themselves. Now, if we could only find how to get drug pushers to make some money pushing this kind of addiction, society could celebrate addiction.


  • The more insecure that we are about our own beliefs, the more we try to persuade others to accept our beliefs.


  • Justice, in the sense that most people use the term, is non existent. Justice, just like beauty, exists only in the mind of the beholder.


  • All of us are much closer to being idiots than we are in being as smart we think we are. We tend to think ourselves smart only because we compare ourselves to one another. True, some of us idiots are smarter than some of the other idiots, but that isn’t saying much.


  • The line between being a helper and being an enabler is completely transparent. Only long after crossing that line do we become aware that what we thought was helping was really enabling.


  • Although many may claim that their greatest fear is death, it is obvious that if the sum of our fears were totaled, that it would be found that their greatest fear was in living. Fear of death may be the most intense but it is minor compared to the total of our fears in living.


  • First impressions are about as reliable as knowing what is inside of a gift because of its wrapping.


  • Of all of the Potemkin Villages which society has built, none come close to doing as much harm as the Potemkin Villages which we’ve built in our minds. These villages are built to protect us from knowing the truth about our beliefs and the beliefs held by the significant others which we tend to surround ourselves. We dare not look around the facades” edges for the fear that we may find out that nothing is there and never was except our wanting the apparent protection which these facades provided.


  • WALT HASKINS


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