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Our Human Nature Page 24 of  161

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  • The ripples we create will lap on shores that we will never see.


  • We often quote out of context, but we more often live out of context.


  • There will come a morning when we would be glad to have halitosis.


  • Our lives are like the balls in pin-ball machines; no matter how skillfully the game is played, we all end up in the hole at the bottom.


  • Buried beneath our defenses against our fears and beneath our obsessions to fulfill our desires, lies beauty that even the possessor knows not.


  • If we’re at the top of the food chain, why is it that mosquitoes dine on us, but we don’t dine on them?


  • When we destroy the dreams of others, we produce those individuals that will create our nightmares.


  • It is true that the future isn’t what it used to be, and for this we should be glad because neither are we.


  • A genius often comes like a genie that pops out of an old bottle once the stopper of fear is removed.


  • Many, correctly sensing the cause of their miseries, spend the rest of their lives taking revenge on themselves.


  • Perhaps the time will come when we have grown enough to have the same prejudices as the opposing pieces in a chess set.


  • The uncharted path from the delivery room to the grave is strewn with dreams and broken glass, but with no guarantees other than the path’s ending.


  • To put today’s trials in perspective, just try and remember a year ago as to how trivial those trials seem today, that is if they can be remembered at all.


  • Fame is like a rocket on Independence Day; spectacular but soon forgotten by all, while a kindness, sensed only by one other, can be remembered for a lifetime.


  • Comforting delusions are like alcohol to an alcoholic; in that after addicted to such delusions, remedy is rarely ever sought. This is because we tend to surround our selves with those that share the same delusions very much like alcoholics are drawn to bars.


  • Like a fisherman’s net, our minds sweep through the present snaring some experiences into our storehouses of memories, but losing most, without our ever knowing the basis for either the selecting or the rejecting.


  • All that is required to make an imagined event become a recollection is the frequent mulling of the imagined event over a protracted period.


  • The beckoning veil of the unknown will always exist as long as some of mankind remains immune from the infectious delusions of certainties.


  • We cannot thrust our fingers into firm soil although the fragile roots of a flower can do so easily. The biggest difference between our fingers and those roots is the flower’s persistence.


  • Sleep is the fallowness of the conscious in preparing the mind’s fertile field for tomorrow’s plantings.


  • Though many lust for great power, none of us need more power than is necessary to fend off the dominating power of others.


  • Some seem to think that it’s wise to squander health to preserve wealth, even when their wealth is more than can ever be needed and their health sits on a precipice.


  • The most violent anger often arises when one is conclusively shown to be wrong on something that was obvious beforehand.


  • The more we learn to "face the music", the more we turn our backs on our fears.


  • If we can imagine our minds functioning like computers, then we could say that as we age our hard drive seems OK but our RAM weakens perceptibly with time, eventually approaching the reliability of recalling dreams.


  • Those that have no regrets of the past will act without concern for the present.


  • Each generation, while still young, tends to believe that the preceding generation was greatly advantaged over the present one. Each generation when becoming old recognizes the absurdities of those youthful beliefs that assumed the ease of the prior generations.


  • WALT HASKINS


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