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Our Human Nature Page 38 of  161

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  • Most of our problems arise from mistaking mirrors for windows.


  • Humans are a do-it-yourself kind of creature that much prefers to make its own mistakes rather than learn from the mistakes of others.


  • The more self-doubt a person has the more sensitive to being offended.


  • It isnít unreasonable to expect reasonable people to abide by their own reasoning, but few do.


  • Both love and hate can grow unabatedly if fed with the source of what created them.


  • No matter how great is an individual or despised is another, if we will only search within ourselves, we will find scattered fragments of what made both.


  • One of todayís problems is that we have too many insignificant-others.


  • If we claim that we care for our relatives, then it is clear that we care for all mankind


  • Even if life is long, it isnít necessarily deep and wide.


  • If we were incapable of feeling sorrow and remorse, it is likely that we would also be incapable of feeling joy and rapture.


  • It has been, it is, and it will always be that our inventory of wisdom is vastly smaller than our inventory of stupidity. Therefore the likelihood of a random something being stupid instead of wise is a no-brainer.


  • Strangely, the more we know of any person, the more certain we find the person not normal.


  • When young, we believed that we knew ourselves because we knew our fears and desires, and little more. Later, when good fortune allowed us to dispatch those fears and desires; a new and deeper self is revealed that bore little kinship to what we earlier believed ourselves to be.


  • One of the blessings of youth is its lack of ability to act more strongly on its impulses.


  • That misery loves company could also be a recommendation for seeking solitude.


  • Life is a learning experience, but if only the lessons could be easier and the graduation later.


  • The best test of oneís complete integrity is to be found when otherís opinions of us match perfectly with what we truly are, with no aversion as to revealing anything about oneself.


  • We tend to love flattery as long as it comes disguised as fact.


  • The power, inherent in being physically attractive, can corrupt as thoroughly as any other kind of power.


  • In the final analysis, the heart usually rules the mind although there are a few exceptions; the driver of a car should be the one that determines where a car travels, not the other way around.


  • The easiest way to take advantage of another is to engage them in conduct where they are taking advantage of someone else.


  • Tolerance in oneís own failure is a reward for failing and an encouragement for more.


  • Gratitude is most sincere when genuine appreciation is shown without an offer of reciprocity.


  • The weaker the mind, the greater is the appeal of custom, ritual and dogma.


  • One of the communications that we most like to receive is delivered by the ears of others.


  • We are branded ďfailureĒ more by our own acts than the acts of others; for we are never a failure until we choose to give up and accept failure.


  • We are presented with far more opportunities to do ill than to do well.


  • The most tyrannical of all groups are those minorities that feel oppressed by the majorities.


  • Justification is for naught; even the criminal feels justified in his criminality.


  • Meanness is the halitosis of thinking that breaths ill into every thought.


  • There is a strange personality that seems to get only one satisfaction from living, and that comes from rolling obstacles into the paths of others.


  • Oneís attitudes are chiefly responsible for oneís rising or falling to oneís eventual altitudes.


  • Death may be certain, but life beforehand isnít.


  • How different life would be if we were as concerned about what goes on behind our eyes as we are as to what goes on in front of them.


  • Long ago fears wither into vague aversions that we no longer recognize as fears.


  • One thing that can be said about drug addiction is that it always gives one something to look forward to.


  • Many a road in life would go untraveled were it not for vanity sitting in the passengerís seat.


  • Our character defects never leave, but often the conditions that revive them are kept at bay sufficiently to make them invisible.


  • The chains that enslave can be either around our bodies or within them.


  • WALT HASKINS


Comments - Our Human Nature
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