Comments USA - Points to Ponder / Comments about life in America.
 

CATEGORIES
Our Acts
Our Human Nature
Our Investments
Our Non-Religious Beliefs
Our Politics
Our Religious Beliefs
Our Surroundings


Let us know if you have questions about any of our comments. You can e-mail us at: walt@commentsusa.com
Our Surroundings Page 83 of  101

Pages: |<<  <<prev  | 77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  |  next>> >>|

  • THE PILLAGE OF OUR HAPPINESS


  • If there were only someway that the average American could list all of the positives and all of the negatives, of living today in America, and then compare that with all of the same positives and negatives of being the Emperor of Rome at its height, there would be few Americans that would, after careful consideration, be willing to make the change if that change were to be irreversible. Those that romanticize about the times of very long ago before industrial modernization should remember the words of Thomas Hobbes- Pre-industrial life was-"nasty, brutish, and short."


  • It is easy to overlook the enormous number of positives that we have in our lives that we take for granite that could never been hoped for in ancient Rome. Small things like dental care, both of the preventative and remedial kinds, safe water to drink and warm water to have at our disposal whenever we want to bathe and modern toilets to dispose of wastes. Also, we can turn on the TV at anytime to have our choice of entertainments of a quality that would never have been hoped for back then. Also we can have just the music that we want anytime and anyplace that we want. We can have the temperature in our homes, whether on the coldest or hottest days, just what we choose. We can have privacy or anonymity any time that we choose, and travel quickly to almost anywhere that we choose, and even talk to someone thousands of miles away. Even the simple aspirin for a headache would have been a miracle at that time, but we seldom consider all of the thousands of other products that enrich our lives daily, that are available whenever we choose. Even the simple electric light, that can be turned on or off as we choose, would have been undreamt of at that time and for millennia thereafter.


  • But, the question remains as to why we focus on all of the things that we donít have, that do exist today, and ignore all of the positive things that also exist today that didnít exist just a century or two earlier. It is obvious that by focusing on what we are lacking, and ignoring most of what we do have, that that is detrimental to our ever acquiring happiness; and, if anything, we are trending more and more towards the happiness-destruction habit of doing just that. By just simply focusing on all of the wondrous things that we have today, that would been unimaginable just a short-time ago, we would enrich our lives without the need to work harder just to buy more, of what will soon afterwards, be ignored along with all of the other positives in our daily lives.


  • By ignoring our positives, we commit perhaps, the greatest tragedy of modern life, the inability to find happiness in a world and in a time of plenty. The probable reason for this is not in our character, but in the way that we permit the commercialization of America to pillage the happiness that is there for almost anyone to acquire free of charge. As long as we permit those, who want to create desires within us, to have the freedom to do just that, happiness will be impossible and always be dangled just ahead of as a product of acquiring something that seems to have happiness locked within. The ability to block our vulnerability, to being corrupted by the wishes of others, is a part of our character however, and can be implemented by anyone that is determined to be happy.


  • As a product of the successful grafting of desires onto us, we then tend to incur debt so that the wanted, but unneeded, can be acquired. In so doing, especially when done to excess, the effect is to become a perpetual slave to the need of repaying others. There are laws that prohibit anyone from selling us into slavery, but there is no law that prevents us from selling ourselves into bondage through incurring debt.


  • Therefore, to what extent the average American finds life to be mostly negatives, that individual is ignoring the free and readily accessible acquisition of happiness that, in the process, would also avoid the slavery that follows by going into debt.


  • ______________________________________


  • Although we are probably in no danger of entering a new Dark Age, we perhaps are entering a Twilight Age that may last for decades depending on the success of the growing forces of darkness that are now emerging from the shadows.


  • Even a fool will speak of some wisdom if allowed to continue, but will not know which is wise and which is foolish.


  • Many of lifeís gifts should be regarded as wages for performances well done.


  • The fox doesnít care about the prestige of the owner of the hen house.


  • Think three times before loaning money to a lawyer.


  • First impressions of others are like the first impressions of a watermelon; it isnít until they open that you discover what is important.


  • WALT HASKINS


Comments - Our Surroundings
Page 83 of  101

Pages: |<<  <<prev  | 77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  |  next>> >>|


© 2003-2009 | Comments USA / e-3 Design. All rights reserved. | Site design by e-3 Design